Recovering and Cooking

Thursday, 12 October 2006

Body’s slowly repairing itself after the weekend’s bout of food poisoning. Despite the lousy indigestion that strikes every afternoon after lunch, I still felt game for whipping up something new in the kitchen. My new online place of interest is now [BBC’s Food website](http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/), and I found a recipe there for [quiche lorraine](http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/quichelorraine_71987.shtml). It took me all of yesterday evening to make it and Han didn’t get his dinner till close to 11pm (the shortcrust pastry took a while to prepare). At the time my stomach was still unsettled so I had a cup of Marmite in lieu of solids—I didn’t know what the quiche tasted like. :p Han loved it, and tonight I could taste why. Two thumbs up for this recipe!

On a related note, last night’s surfing revealed some interesting remedies for nausea and indigestion, be it during pregnancies, post-surgical recovery periods or motion sickness. Here are some tips I picked up:

1. Ginger tea helps to alleviate wind which could cause nausea.
2. Eating smaller meals at more frequent intervals helps your tummy deal with digestion, especially during pregnancy when the digestive tract’s muscles are relaxed from the high levels of oestrogen and progesterone.
3. There’s an acupressure point right smack in the centre of the base of your wrist which you can press to ward off nausea and queasiness. I’ve tried it, and it does seem to work! In the UK and US there are these [wristbands](http://www.morningsicknesshelp.com/biobands.html) with little beads embedded in them to press this point. I don’t recall them being sold in Malaysia though.
4. Keep snacking (on healthy things lah) to make sure you don’t go hungry and end up having gastric problems which can also lead to queasiness.
5. Taking a pro-biotic drink like Yakult or Vitagen after a meal could help ease indigestion. This advice came from my parents’ back neighbour who is a doctor.

5 Comments

#1Gravatar imageHilmy says:

I remember going on a trip back in high school, and one of the girls had serious travel sickness. So a teacher took a scarf, tied the ends together so that it became a loop with a knot, and showed her how to pull it against her wrist so that the knot would press on that exact acupuncture spot. It worked.

Cheap homegrown remedy. :)

#2Gravatar imagekOtAk says:

ok, someone has got to show me where this acupuncture point is!

#3Gravatar imageligeiro says:

I definitely need that remedy. Been stricken with a bout of food poisoning. Last night I hurled my dinner and part of my lunch. Not good.

#4Gravatar imageMichelle says:

Hilmy: WOW, that’s a superb trick! I’ll remember that for life now. Actually it’s great to know that all this will come in handy with the kid. :D

KOtAk: Check out the link on point number 3 in the blog post—there’s a picture there that shows you where the acupressure point is.

Ligeiro: Oh dear, you poor thing! Was that after I saw you at the indian food stall? Anyway, stay clear of food until you actually feel hungry and when you do, don’t overload your insides. Just have plain porridge with some salt. In the meantime work on getting yourself rehydrated—if your doctor hasn’t already given you some, get oral rehydration salts (ORS) from a pharmacy. Alternatively take an isotonic drink, but they tend to be too sweet.

#5Gravatar imageNicole says:

Don’t you just love BBC Food? It’s like the smartest ever recipe search engine and most of the recipes come from celebrity chefs! Take care of yourself back there!

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